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Presentation Guidelines and Tips

Presentation Types

Paper and colloquium presenters
- Link to guidelines
- Link to tips

Poster presenters
- Link to guidelines
- Link to tips

 

For paper and colloquium presenters


PRESENTATION GUIDELINES
1. PRESENTATION TIME

Paper session: Conforming to the presentation time limit is critical. Each paper session is allocated 20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for questions and answers. Session moderators will have timekeeping cards to assist you. All presenters using PowerPoint or the internet for their presentations should do a test-run and preview their presentation on the equipment in the presentation room in advance (e.g., before the first morning session or during lunch) to make sure there are no technical problems. We will have tech support volunteers on hand for assistance.

Colloquium session: Colloquium organizers are responsible for communicating with presenters about their session schedule, keeping time, and moderating the session. Colloquium organizers may divide their time as they choose, but it is recommended that there be enough time allocated for opening and closing remarks, equal presentation time for the different papers within the colloquium, and discussion. All presenters using PowerPoint or the internet for their presentations should do a test-run and preview their presentation on the equipment in the presentation room in advance (e.g., before the first morning session or during lunch) to make sure there are no technical problems. We will have tech support volunteers on hand for assistance.

2. ROOM SPECIFICATIONS
Please check your presentation rooms and prepare copies of your handout accordingly.
* Keoni Auditorium (maximum capacity - 300 people) [click here]
* Koi Room (maximum capacity - 100 people) [click here]
* Asia Room (maximum capacity - 60 people) [click here]
* Pacific Room (maximum capacity - 60 people) [click here]
* Sarimanok Room (maximum capacity - 60 people) [click here]
* Kaniela Room (maximum capacity - 40 people) [click here]

3. ROOM EQUIPMENT
Each room will be equipped with an overhead projector, an LCD projector, projector screen, and a PC with Windows XP and internet connection. Macintosh users need to bring thier own laptop and a VGA connector. Please send a request for any special tech needs via emal to nflrc@hawaii.edu by February 15.

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PRESENTATION TIPS

(a) If your paper contains data, present it visually either as a PowerPoint presentation or transparency display. Alternatively, you may wish to include it on any handouts you provide for audience members.
You are strongly advised to make copies of your handouts in advance. In a pinch, however, there are a number of commercial copy shops (e.g., Kinkos) relatively close to the university, as well as copy machines at the university libraries (though not of the best quality).

(b) Presenters, keeping in mind that you will only have 20 minutes for presentation of your paper plus 10 minutes for audience questions & answers, consider keeping any review of literature or background information to a minimum (just covering what is necessary to adequately understand and interpret your study and its content). Often times presenters take nearly 15 minutes giving background information, leaving only 5 minutes to get to their main points or research results. This can be terribly frustrating for the audience, many of whom may already be familiar with your area. Your primary focus should be on your own work and the implications it may have for your audience.

(c) Focus on making several key points rather than the detailed and thorough analysis expected of a published paper. The idea should be to stimulate interest in your work and get some useful feedback and discussion from the audience.

(d) We strongly recommend that you time and rehearse your presentation in order to comfortably fit it into your given time limit. Keep in mind that the audience is listening to your paper. Often times, if a paper is read word-for-word from a text (i.e., one prepared for publication), it becomes difficult to follow.

(e) Finally, each paper has been accepted on the assumption that the study has been or will be completed by the time of the conference in March. If it turns out that your project is not at the point where at least some findings can be presented, we request that you withdraw and provide the opportunity for someone else to participate in the conference.

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For poster presenters


PRESENTER GUIDELINES
1. SCHEDULE
There will be two poster sessions, March 13th and 14th. Make sure you check which day you are presenting. Posters should be set up by 9:00 am on your presentation day in the Wailana Room (garden level of the Imin Conference Center). Volunteers will be on hand from 8:00 am to help with set up. Although posters will be displayed for the full day, the official presentation of posters will take place 11:30 am–1:00pm on Friday and 12:15 pm–2:00 pm on Saturday. During this time, presenters will stand with their posters and interact with the audience. Posters should be taken down by 4:15 pm on your presentation day.

2. THE DISPLAY SPACE
Poster boards stand approximately 6 ft. high from the ground. The maximum poster board dimensions are 63.5 inches high (161.3 cm) X 48 inches wide (116.8 cm). To see the size of the poster board, click [here].

3. THE POSTER
Posters should be designed to fit within the maximum display space. However, note that posters which utilize all of the vertical space may create difficulties for viewing (i.e., it is best to design the poster such that it can be viewed at eye level). Paper or laminated posters will work the best with the display boards, as these are easiest to affix with push pins; pins will be provided to help fasten your poster to the board. If you bring a mounted poster (e.g., using foam core backing material), you will need to bring your own pins as appropriate to the depth of the mounting.

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POSTER PRESENTATION TIPS
(a) A poster outlines all of the key points of your study briefly (e.g., the theoretical framework or important background information for your work, your research questions or hypotheses, your methodology, your key findings, and any implications your study might have). Because it is a poster, anyone who walks by and reads it should have a pretty good idea of the main ideas of your work. During your poster presentation period, they can come back, ask you questions, get more details, offer feedback, etc. Poster presentations are more informal than papers, and they offer a great opportunity for one-on-one interaction between speaker and audience members.

(b) Posters should be printed out (not handwritten). They also often have graphs, charts, etc. summarizing data if applicable. Some people print out each major section of their study on a separate piece of paper and attach each of those up on the board to form their poster. Others have one large poster, with all the sections on it, specially printed out (copy shops have large-format printers for this purpose), which they can just roll up and take with them. Some even get them laminated or use colors on them.
NOTE: You can use Microsoft PowerPoint to create a large poster. Take a look at an example poster here: [click here].

(c) You may want to bring along handouts to distribute during the official poster viewing session. You are strongly advised to make copiese of your handouts in advance. In a pinch, however, there are a number of commercial copy shops (e.g., Kinkos) relatively close to the university, as well as copy machines at the university libraries (though not of the best quality).

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