What is dyslexia and how can we help Japanese people to get/give support?

A Project Prototype by Naoko Nemoto

published on Oct 10, 2017

In Japan, dyslexia is not known well yet. The vast majority of the Japanese people had never heard of the word until very recently. Some says that dyslexia is underdiagnosed in Japan due to its transparent orthgraphy. Some says that when Japanese children with dyslexia start learning a foregin language with opaque orthography such as English, they exhibit symptoms but most often they are simply dismissed. On the other hand, in American schools, dyslexia is a well-recognized learning difficulty and various kinds of support are available.

The purpose of this project is to help newcomers from Japan to understand what dyslexia is and how to get/give support in American schools. Given that dyxlexia itself is not well-known and its support is not likely to be available in Japan, in addition to neither students nor parents speak English well, it is difficult for them to find resources.The final product will be an educational video clip that will be uploaded on the web. Therefore, the messages on this video could reach beyond the local area. Learners will first show the video to the live audience, namely Japanese children and parents in the local Saturday Japanese school and receive feedback from them before uploading it on the web. 

While we cannot prevent dyslexia, we can contribute to reduce misconceptions and prejudice against people with dyslexia. Diversity and inclusion is one of the primary educational goals today. Our college provides good support for students with learning difficulties, including dyslexia. Since our students have leanred Japanese orthography as an adult (with some difficulties), I expect them to be able to provide different perspectives from native speakers of Japanese adults who learned Japnese orthgraphy as a child without much difficulty.

During this project, learners will actively investigate the Human Service/Education and Training by ESS01.02.02 adapting language for audience, purpose, and situation; ESS02.07 Interpreting verbal and nonverbal cues/behaviors to enhance communication with client/participants; ESS 02.08 applying active listening skills to obtain and clarify information; HU3.1 providing service that are sensitive to cultural and disability issues.

Career Pathway Education Teaching Training

Learners will first engage in sustained inquiry about the Japanese orthography and how that is compared with the English orthography with respect to dyslexia as well as what are the social issues on dyslexia. They will, then, explore what kind of support for students with dyxlexia is available in local schools (Western Massachusetts), including their own college. Prior to creating a video, they will visit a local Japanese Saturday school to conduct interviews with students and/or parents from Japan to examine how much they know about dyslexia and what misconceptions they might posesse.

This project will enhance learners' skills to use available technology such as Google translator, Rikaichan, and Reading Tutor, to supplement their reading and writing skills in Japanese.

Overview files comments

Preparing for the Project

Presentational language

Interview language

Formal e-mail writing

Different orthographies in the world

Launching the Project

Introduction to the project

Experience simulated dyslexia world

Mechanism of reading

What is going on? Why we care?

What style of language should be used for our video?

Japanese orthography experience (individual video)

Common symptoms of dyslexia

Orthographies and dyslexia

Preparetion for interviews with the audience

Interview: Get to know the audience

Dyslexia support in American schools

Managing the Project

Organize ideas and timelines for the video

Scripts of the video

Create a video clip

Screening of the video with the live audience

Finalize the project

Assessment

Assessment 1 : Individual video

Assessment 2: Interview preparation

Assessment 3: Information conversion

Assessment 4: Video scripts

Assessment 5: Video creation and presentation

Assessment 6: The final product

Teamwork Assessment

Implementation Info

Implementation information not specified.

Preparing for the Project

Presentational language

Prior to this project, learners will practice how to make a formal presentation in Japanese.

Interview language

In order to conduct interviews with the target audience, learners will learn how to conduct interviews in Japanese

Technology Tips

How to record a conversation

Formal e-mail writing

In order to communicate with the principle of the Saturday Japanese School, learners will learn how to write formal e-mail.

Technology Tips

Typing Japanese

Different orthographies in the world

Learners will learn different contemporary orthographies in the world and how they are categorized (logophraphic, syllabic, alphabetic).

Launching the Project

Introduction to the project

Give the overview of the project and clarify what the learners are expected to do and what choices they have.

Product Task Map

Experience simulated dyslexia world

Using the dyslexia similation video clips in the link below, learners will experience what it is like to read with dyslexia. After that, they will hear what it is like to have dyxlexia from two students in the second video (beginning to 2:30). Learners will watch the videos with the worksheet below (scaffolding).

Dyslexia simulation video (Video A)

Student experience video (Video B)

Dyslexia simulation worksheet (Deliverable)

Mechanism of reading

Prior to dealing with issues of dyslexia, learners will learn how "reading" happens in brain with focus on the relationship between letters and sounds.

Reading candidate 1: "Train your brain" by R. Kawashima (from a 6th Grade textbook)

What is going on? Why we care?

Discuss what learners know about dyslexia.

Watch 3:15 - 8:53 of the following video. Using the knowledge from the reading (Mechanism of reading) and this video, discuss what can be the problems, what we want to know about dyslexia and whether there is anything we can do about it.

Video of a student with dyslexia (Video C)

What style of language should be used for our video?

Learners will discuss who (e.g. elementary school children? Adults?) should be the main target of the video that they will create (learners' choice) and what style of the language they should use for the video. Watch several video clips and hold group (project group) discussion on what language style is appropriate for educational/informational video clips.

Learners have already watched three different video clips (A,B,C) that are different in terms of the language style.

Career Pathway:

ESS01.02.02 adapting language for audience, purpose, and situation

Japanese orthography experience (individual video)

Learners will test out some popular video creating soft and choose one that they want to use for this assignment "sharing Japanese learning experience." Learners will create (including editing) a short video clip (for the audience of their choice) to talk about his/her Japanese learning experience focusing on its writing system (in their choice of language style). The video should explain the similarities and differences among the orthographies of their native language, Japanese, and other language(s) that they have learned, using the knowledge from the previous readings and classes.

Deliverable: Video Clip (Assessment 1)

Common symptoms of dyslexia

Learners will select what to read about dyslexia based on their reading level and share what they have found out by giving a short informal presentation. The candidates for readings include children's books, manga, informational website (e.g. the Dyslexia Association of Japan).

Reading candidate 1

Reading candidate 2

Reading candidate 3

Orthographies and dyslexia

Learners will read a short article on how phonological dyxlexia happens and analyze why it is more visible in English than Japanese.

Reading candidate 1

Technology Tips

Rikaichan or Reading Tutor

Preparetion for interviews with the audience

Learners will consider what information from the audience helps them to creat a video clip and prepare for the interviews with the audience. They will also decide how they conduct interviews (e.g. individual, pair, group).  The questions include what information the audience wants from a local expert whom the learners will meet before they start creating a video script. The representatives of the group will write to the principle of the Saturday Japanese school a week before the meeting and after the meeting.

SLO:  Learners will be able to prepare for Japanese interviews about school-reated issues, using the appropriate politeness level and school related vocabulary. 

Deliverable: Interview questions (Assessment 2)

Learners will practice "active listening" (Career pathway ESS 02.08).

Learners will be instructed to pay attention to non-verbal behavior of the interviewees (Career pathway ESS02.07)

Career Pathway:

ESS02.07 Interpreting verbal and nonverbal cues/behaviors to enhance communication with client/participants

ESS 02.08 applying active listening skills to obtain and clarify information

Interview: Get to know the audience

Interview students and/or parents of the Saturday Japanese school, using the prepared quesitons.  They will find out what they know about dyslexia and its support system and whether they have any misconceptions or concerns regarding dyslexia. The purpose of this activity includes getting to know the audience for the final product. If allowed, learners will record (video) the interview for further analysis, including non-verbal behavior of native speakers.

After the interview, the learners will discuss who (e.g. children, parents)they want to be the main audience for their video.

SLO: Learners will be able to conduct Japanese interviews about school related issues by applying active listening (e.g. confirming and clarifying important issues) and interpreting non-verbal behavior of the interviewees.

 

Deliverable: Live interview; What they found out from the interview (content and verbal and non-verbal behavior)

Discussion on self-assessment and reflection on interview to follow

Dyslexia support in American schools

Learners will meet a local expert and find out what types of support are available in American schools for students with dyslexia and what is the best way to start getting such support for the audience. It is likely that the local expert does not speak Japanese. Therefore, learners must convert the information they have got in Japanese.

Deliverable: Dyslexia support information in Japanese (Assessment 3)

The assessment of this activity is not only how well they can convert the information into Japanese but also whether they can utilize available resources and technology to conduct translation and check its accuracy.

 

Managing the Project

Organize ideas and timelines for the video

Learners will hold group discussion on the contents and organization of the video. Learners will make a list of individual responsibilities and the project timelines (who do what by when) for the final product.

Deliverable:  The project proposal and timelines

Scripts of the video

Learners will present the scripts of the video with the Power Point slides in class to get feedback for revision

SLO: Leaners will be able to plan a professional quaility video that promote understanding of a social issue by critically analyzing and organizing the information that they gathered from many different sources.

Deliverable:  Video scripts (Assessment 4)

Create a video clip

Learners will create a video clip to promote the understanding of dyslexia and to advise how to get/give support for children with dyslexia.

SLO: Learners will be able to create a good quality video to promote understanding of a social issue by using appropriate technology and language.

Screening of the video with the live audience

Learners will visit the Saturday Japaense School to show their final product. They will get questions and feedback from the audience

Deliverable: Presentation with a video clip that they created (Assessment 5)

Finalize the project

Learners will reflect their project by considering feedbacks from the audience. Make the final editing of the video, if necessary, for the web version.

SLO: Learners will be able to productively reflect their own work to prepare for the future project.

Deliverable:  Video clip to be uploaded on Web (Assessment 6)

At the end, learners will assess and reflect works of their teammates.

Teamwork Assessment

 

Assessment

Assessment 1 : Individual video

Each learner will receive assessment from the teacher and one of the classmate on his/her video that introduces how he/she learned Japanese orthography and what he/she thinks of dyslexia.

Rubric 1

Assessment 2: Interview preparation

Learners get feedbacks on the prepared questions for the interviews before they meet the interviewees for their peer (on content relevancy and language use including politeness) and instructor (language accuracy). Learners will also get feedback from their peer regarding how they are doing as a group project member.

Rubric 2

Assessment 3: Information conversion

Learners will convert the important information that they acquire from the local expert in English into Japanese with help from native speakers of Japanese. This assessment is not only on the translated texts but also on how well learners could utilize resources (e.g. dictionaries, google translate, native speakers).

Rubric 3

Assessment 4: Video scripts

The scripts for the video will be assesed in terms of its effectiveness communication, and accuracy of the information and language by peer and instructor.

Rubric 4

Assessment 5: Video creation and presentation

The video clip and the way that was presented to the live audience, including introduction, will be assessed by the target audience and self.

Rubric 5

Assessment 6: The final product

After the presentation of the video clip, learners may revise the video. The final version will be assessed by peer and instructor. The peer assessment includes the process of this project such as how cooperative this individual was for the project.

Rubric 6

Teamwork Assessment

Learners will assess their project groupmates reflecting the project proposal and timelines that they submitted earlier.

Rubric 7

Implementation Info

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