Encouraging and Engaging Young Brazilian Readers

A Project Prototype by Rachel Mamiya Hernandez

published on Aug 8, 2017

According to UNESCO's 2012-2015 Round Table on Literacy Action Plan for Brazil, "Teaching children to read and write is still a major challenge", with children living in the North and Northeast of the country having the highest indicies of illiteracy. This project seeks to raise awareness around this issue and address it via a literacy campaign and the creation and distribution of books for young readers in poor communities in the state of Bahia in Northeastern Brazil.

Overview files comments

Preparing for the Project

Show and Teletandem

What makes a good children's book?

Narrating in the past

A Critical examination of Children's books in Brazil

Launching the Project

Interview with Communities

Managing the Project

Project Group Work Reports

Story Brainstorming!

Individual Work Reports

Project Calendar

Video Campaign

Editing, Illustrations, Layout and Publishing

Writing, Feedback, and Revising

Assessment

Final Product Assessment

Audience reception and Feedback

Implementation Info

Implementation information not specified.

Preparing for the Project

Show and Teletandem

Students will Skype with their Teletandem partners who are university students at the Universidade Estadual de São Paulo- Araraquara and ask them about their favorite children's books and stories. This task is designed to get the students thinking about the topic of Children's literature and learn more about Children's books and stories in Brazil.

 

Unfortunately, due to unforeseen circumstances, I had to miss the day we scheduled to talk to our Teletandem partners about children's books in Brazil.  Here is a summary of what the students found out from their Skype sessions with their partners in Brazil.

Technology Tips

Students will connect with their Brazilian teletandem partners through Skype.

Task Extension

 They will summarize the feedback from their partners and try to identify key engaging elements and themes.

What makes a good children's book?

Students will preview and review ebooks and paper books written in Portuguese.  They will identify key elements that make a good story. After identifying key elements, students will begin to create the rubric for the final book.

Here is the rubric we used to evaluate the books.  Here are the guidelines/criteria for successful children's book that we came up with, we will use these to build our final project rubric.

Technology Tips

Google docs to construct the rubric

Narrating in the past

Review books, short stories and consult some preexisting grammar materials on the Clica Brasil site.

Task Extension

How do we incorporate these structures into our own stories.

A Critical examination of Children's books in Brazil

Professor Sávio Siqueira from the Universidade Federal da Bahia will visit the class and encourage a critical examination of exisiting children's literature in Brazil.  He will also discuss demystifying stereotypes and how we can make a book that better reflects the realities of the children in our target audience communities.  We used the menino Gustavo video as a starting point for the discussion.

Launching the Project

Interview with Communities

Skype meeting and interview with the target audience communities.  Students will get to meet the school, NGO and community participants and some of the children (if possible).  They will learn more about the communities and bring any questions about likes and dislikes of the students, looking for what engages them and makes them want to read.

 

Skype interview with teachers from PRACATUM Social Project.  Unfortunately due to the time difference and technology infrastructure at the school, only I was able to talk to Kelly, the teacher.  I did report back to the class with information on the community and students.

Technology Tips

Skype

Task Extension

We will use this to help us with our driving question on how to engage and inspire young readers from these communities.

Managing the Project

Project Group Work Reports

Group Progress Report (Relatório de Progresso: Grupo) Since it was a small class and students became very invested in their books, they worked individually and not in groups.

Story Brainstorming!

Students (individually or in pairs) come up with story ideas and pitch them. Class reviews ideas and votes on the best ideas.  The top two ideas will become the stories we work on. Here is a rubric to evaluate intial story pitches.

Technology Tips

Google docs and slides

Individual Work Reports

During each week of the project, students will submit individual work reports  (relatório de progresso: indivíduo) that track their progress, reflect on their work and plan the next steps.

Project Calendar

This is not really a task, but it is the Project Calendar, it outlines when tasks will be completed.  Note that it is tentative and some dates may change.  Also, the target audience will not receive the books until around May/June 2016.

Video Campaign

Students make short youtube or vine-type videos encouraging and inviting the children to read their books and encouraging them to read in general.

Editing, Illustrations, Layout and Publishing

Students work  on the editing, illustrations and final layout of the books. Books will be sent to be published. We used Storybird for creating, editing, and publishing the books.

Writing, Feedback, and Revising

Students will work on writing, giving and receiving peer feedback and revising stories in groups. Peer feedback in small groups & instructor feedback on Storybird.

Technology Tips

Storybird

Assessment

Final Product Assessment

The final version(s) of the book(s) will be assessed via the co-constructed rubric and agreed upon criteria.  The videos for the video campaign will also be assessed with this video assessment rubric.

Audience reception and Feedback

When the books are given to the children and the videos are watched.  The children will give their feedback via short videos or a happy face rating scale with the opportunity for comments.  This will most likely happen after the school year has ened, so the students involved in the project will receive this feedback via the teacher and reports from the group that delivered the books.While not a formal assessment, it is an assessment of the final product of sorts. 

             

Delivering the Books                             The children in the Pracatum Project

 

 

Implementation Info

Comments