Clean Water for All / Agua Limpia para Todos

A Project Prototype by Stacy Amling

published on Sep 1, 2015

All too often, we frame the discussion of clean water and water access as a problem that others face. We take for granted that the water coming out of our faucet is clean and drinkable. With this project, my students and I will examine the important issue of water quality, keeping in mind that our own water in central Iowa has had been deemed unsafe to drink recently because of high levels of nitrates, due in large part to agriculture run-off. We are going to examine this issue from multiple perspectives and prepare materials in Spanish about it for the Latino community in Iowa.

Overview files comments

Preparing for the Project

Tasks not specified.

Launching the Project

Project Kick-Off

Brainstorming

Managing the Project

Identifying Resources

Interviews & Investigation

Drafting

Peer Review & Revision

Assessment

Practice Presentations (in Class)

Community Partner Presentation

Implementation Info

Implementation information not specified.

Preparing for the Project

Launching the Project

Project Kick-Off

In class, we will kick off our investigation of this topic by watching this video. It doesn't have any words, but the images are powerful. We will do some pre-watching and post-watching discussion using this handout.

Brainstorming

As we begin to investigate the issue of water quality in our community, it is important that we establish where we are and what we want to do as a collaborative group. Group brainstorming is a good way to begin. I plan to use a K-W-H-L format (What we KNOW, What we WANT to find out, HOW we can find out, and What we have LEARNED).

Technology Tips

Padlet is a useful tool for collaboratively creating online information board (similar to how we have used poster paper on the wall in the past). Students can easily refer back to our brainstorming list.

Task Extension

Students can continue to add to the initial list as the inquiry process deepens. It can serve as a useful review to revisit the brainstorming list as the project progresses.

Managing the Project

Identifying Resources

To build on the brainstorming work done previously, students will work in small groups to identify relevant resources, including articles, videos, ads/commercials, and community leaders who might be able to help us learn more about the issues related to water quality. These resources will be collected on a Pinterest board for the class (those students who don't have Pinterest can share with others or with the instructor). Ideally in this process, we will identify community experts that the students can interview.

Once these community experts have been identified, we will formulate questions (in Spanish) that can be used in the interviews. We can add to our language "need to knows" and refine the questions along the way.

Technology Tips

Pinterest is a great resource to collect online resources, and using a shared board (either secret or public) is a way that multiple students can contribute by pinning links.

Interviews & Investigation

During this time, students will meet (either face-to-face or online) with the experts and conduct their interviews, using the questions we've written and their interview guides. After they do that, they will have additional work time to see which of their questions have been answered and what other information is still needed, so we can continue the inquiry process. As a part of the debriefing process, we will revisit our K-W-H-L chart on Padlet and add our new information and identify areas that still need more work.

Drafting

Now that students have had time to consult a variety of sources (video, print, and experts), they will use that information to prepare their materials. Ideally, these will be online, possibly infographics, videos, VoiceThread presentations, etc., that can be shared via our community partner. 

Peer Review & Revision

Students will bring their drafts to class in order to get feedback on their progress so far. Students will share their drafts with other classmates and get feedback on content (and to a lesser extent, the language used) from both classmates and the instructor.

Assessment

Practice Presentations (in Class)

In preparation for sharing our final products with our community partners and the Latino community in our area, students will present them in class and get additional feedback.

Community Partner Presentation

As part of our culminating celebration, we will hold an open house with our community partner and premiere our Spanish-language materials about water quality issues in Iowa. We will host a gallery-walk style event so people can informally view the materials that students have designed.

Implementation Info

Comments