Special Publications

LD&C publishes occasional Special Publications, usually on specific themes. The contents of each of these is given via RSS feed below.

SP24: Phonetic fieldwork in southern New Guinea.
SP23: Theoretical reflections around the role of fieldwork in linguistics and linguistic anthropology: Contributions of Indigenous researchers from southern Mexico
SP22: Reflexiones teóricas en torno a la función del trabajo de campo en lingüística-antropológica: Contribuciones de investigadores indígenas del sur de México.
SP21: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Language Documentation
SP20: Collaborative Approaches to the Challenges of Language Documentation and Conservation
SP19: Documentation and Maintenance of Contact Languages from South Asia to East Asia
SP18: Archival Returns: Central Australia and Beyond
SP17: Language and Toponymy in Alaska and Beyond
SP16: Methodological Tools for Linguistic Description and Typology
SP15: Reflections on Language Documentation on the 20 year anniversary of Himmelmann 1998

SP14: A Grammar of Shilluk
SP13: Documenting Variation in Endangered Languages
SP12: The Social Cognition Parallax Interview Corpus (SCOPIC)
SP11: Mutsun-English English-Mutsun Dictionary, mutsun-inkiS inkiS-mutsun riica pappel
SP10: African language documentation: new data, methods and approaches
SP09: Language Documentation and Conservation in Europe
SP08: The Art and Practice of Grammar Writing
SP07: Language Endangerment and Preservation in South Asia
SP06: Microphone in the mud
SP05: Melanesian languages on the edge of Asia: Challenges for the 21st Century
SP04: Electronic Grammaticography
SP03: Potentials of Language Documentation: Methods, Analyses, and Utilization
SP02: Fieldwork and Linguistic Analysis in Indigenous Languages of the Americas
SP01: Documenting and Revitalizing Austronesian Languages

 

SP24: Phonetic fieldwork in southern New Guinea.
  • 1. The phonetics of Southern New Guinea languagesː an overview
    Abstract: This article provides an overview of the phonologies of Southern New Guinea languages, based on the six languages in this special issue plus two others for which JIPA illustrations have recently been published – Yelmek (Yelmek-Maklew family), Ngkolmpu, Nmbo and Nen (Yam family), Idi and Ende (Pahoturi River), Bitur (Marind-Anim branch of Trans-New Guinea) and Urama (Kiwaian branch of Trans-New Guinea). It surveys overall inventory sizes (maximal 28 consonants…
  • Introduction: Phonetic fieldwork in southern New Guinea
  • 3. Phonetics and Phonology of Ngkolmpu
    Abstract: This paper describes the phonetics and phonology of segments in Ngkolmpu, a language spoken in the Merauke region of Indonesian Papua. The language is a member of the the Tonda-Kanum branch of the Yam family and displays a fairly typical segmental inventory for a Yam language with some notable exceptions. There are sixteen phonemic consonantal segments. As commonly found in Papuan languages, the primary manner distinction of stops is…
  • 2. A phonetic description of Yelmek
    Abstract: This paper provides a first description of the phonetics and phonology of a language from the Yelmek-Maklew family, a language family without a genealogical link to any other language family in New Guinea or elsewhere. The variety under consideration in this paper is used by people from the village of Wanam, located in the Papuan Province on the Indonesian side of New Guinea. Wanam is the northernmost of the…
  • 5. Phonetics and phonology of Idi
    Abstract: This paper provides a first description of the phonetics and phonology of Idi (Pahoturi River; ISO 639-3: idi, glottocode: idii1243) as spoken by about 1,000 people in the villages of Dimsisi and Sibidiri, located in the Morehead District of Western Province, Papua New Guinea. Idi has a fairly large inventory of 21 consonant phonemes and 8 vowel phonemes. As with other languages spoken in the region, the two central…
  • 4. The phonetics of Nmbo (Nɐmbo) with some comments on its phonology (Yam family; Morehead district)
    Abstract: This paper presents aspects of the phonetics and phonology of the Nmbo language as spoken by the Kerake tribe peoples of southern Western Province, Papua New Guinea. The paper is primarily concerned with the phonetics of consonants and vowels, but also presents description and audio examples of stress and clausal intonation patterns.
  • 6. The phonetics of Bitur
    Abstract: This paper offers a description of the phonetics of Bitur, a language spoken by less than a thousand people in Western Province, Papua New Guinea. With just thirteen consonants and five vowels, the phoneme inventory of Bitur is fairly typical of a Papuan language and yet relatively small in its more immediate geographic and genealogical contexts. The consonants of Bitur represent five manners of articulation and span four places…
  • 7. A phonetic sketch of Urama
    Abstract: This paper provides a phonetic sketch of Urama (Glottocode: uram1241), one of the varieties of the Northeast Kiwai group (iso code: kiw). Urama’s consonant and vowel inventories, with 12 and 5 members respectively, are characteristic of Papuan languages generally. Vowel length is contrastive, but may be in the process of being lost. Urama exhibits a pitch accent system, but only a few words are found in which tone alone…
  • SP24 Front Matter
  • SP24 Full volume
  • SP24 Cover


SP23: Theoretical reflections around the role of fieldwork in linguistics and linguistic anthropology: Contributions of Indigenous researchers from southern Mexico

  • About the authors
  • Cultural glossary for the translations
  • Ethical principles in linguistic fieldwork methodologies–According to whom?
    Abstract: This article seeks to establish a dialogue between the methodological proposals that have been put forward for linguistic fieldwork and the growing experiences of Indigenous linguists. It is well known that the theorizing of the methodologies that dictate linguists’ interactions in their communities of study is carried out from a perspective foreign to both the language and the community. These methodologies are designed for and guided by non-Indigenous academics,…
  • Between the academy and the community: The trickster who dances at the party and shows her tongue
    Abstract: Explored here are the complexities and challenges that arise from my experience as an Indigenous researcher. As a linguist and anthropologist, I move between both academic and community spaces. During the last two decades, a good part of my research has focused on the documentation and revitalization of Indigenous languages, in particular the Chatino languages. This article addresses my experience as an Indigenous researcher navigating these two spaces with…
  • "And what are you getting out of this?" Experiencing fieldwork in your community of origin: From reflection into emotional healing
    Abstract: In this essay I share my fieldwork experience as a Zapotec researcher trained in anthropological and linguistic methodologies. I suggest that fieldwork is experienced differently by colleagues of non-Indigenous origin based on ethical, political and internal relationships that cross my academic projects and my personal life.
  • Activism and research for the promotion of literacy in Chatino: Experiences and reflections from fieldwork
    Abstract: In this article, as an insider researcher, I explore my experiences during fieldwork. I discuss personal emotions related to linguistic discrimination and internalization of speakers' negative attitudes toward their language. Also, I discuss the local power relations in the community social network to which my family belongs, and the violence I experience as a woman. As a local researcher I unveil the realities and adversities that I face doing…
  • Between insiders and outsiders: When an indigenous researcher conducts studies in her own community
    Abstract: This work presents the experiences of an Indigenous researcher carrying out linguistic and ethnographic studies within her own community. A growing number of Indigenous peoples are venturing into documentation, description and promotion of their languages of origin. As a field, linguistic documentation and linguistic description were created by and for members of academic institutions that were historically distant from collaborative work with the speakers of Indigenous languages. The author’s…
  • Sk’an jtsatsubtastik ko’ontontik: Dialogues, challenges, and complexities of being a Tsotsil researcher
    Abstract: The article reflects on the experiences of a researcher of Tsotsil origin trained in the fields of linguistics and anthropological linguistics, who lives in the same territorial space of the study community. Specifically, it examines the implications and challenges of being a woman, a Tsotsil and a researcher, who, on the one hand, delves into the social and community spaces that are exclusive to men, and on the other,…
  • Introduction
  • Foreword
  • Translators’ introduction
  • SP23 Front Matter
  • SP23 Cover
  • SP23 Whole Volume


SP22: Reflexiones teóricas en torno a la función del trabajo de campo en lingüística-antropológica: Contribuciones de investigadores indígenas del sur de México.

  • Autores
  • Prólogo
  • Introducción
  • Sk’an jtsatsubtastik ko’ontontik: Diálogos, retos y complejidades de ser una investigadora tsotsil
    Abstract: El artículo reflexiona acerca de las experiencias de una investigadora de origen tsotsil formada en los campos de la lingüística y la lingüística antropológica, quién habita en el mismo espacio territorial de la comunidad de estudio. Específicamente, examina cuáles son las implicaciones y los retos de ser mujer, tsotsil e investigadora, que, por un lado, se adentra en los espacios sociales y comunitarios que son exclusivos de los hombres,…
  • Entre propios y extraños: Cuando una investigadora indígena realiza estudios en su propia comunidad
    Abstract: Este trabajo presenta las experiencias de una investigadora indígena que realiza estudios lingüísticos y etnográficos en su propia comunidad. Actualmente hay un creciente número de académicos integrantes de comunidades indígenas que incursionan en la documentación, descripción y promoción de sus lenguas de origen en un campo que fue creado por y para miembros de instituciones académicas históricamente alejadas del trabajo colaborativo con los hablantes de lenguas indígenas. El artículo…
  • Activismo e investigación para la promoción de la lectoescritura del chatino: Experiencias y reflexiones de trabajo de campo
    Abstract: En este artículo exploro mis experiencias como investigadora local durante el trabajo de campo. Discuto las emociones personales relacionadas a la discriminación lingüística, la internalización de las actitudes negativas que los hablantes tienen sobre su propia lengua. Asimismo, discuto las relaciones de poder local en el tejido comunitario al cual mi familia pertenece y la violencia que experimento como mujer. Como investigadora local expongo las realidades y adversidades a…
  • “¿Y ganas algo de esto?”. La experiencia de trabajo de campo en la comunidad de origen: de la reflexión a la sanidad emocional.
    Abstract: En este ensayo comparto mi experiencia de trabajo de campo como investigadora zapoteca formada dentro de marcos y metodologías de la investigación antropológica y lingüística; sugiero que se experimenta de manera distinta a como lo hacen los colegas de origen no indígena. Expongo el entramado de relaciones éticas, políticas y de polarización interna que atraviesan mis proyectos académicos y mi vida personal.; In this essay I share my fieldwork…
  • Entre la academia y la comunidad: La diabla alegre que baila en la fiesta y muestra su lengua
    Abstract: Se exploran aquí las complejidades y desafíos que surgen desde mi experiencia como investigadora indígena. Mi labor como lingüista y antropóloga se ha ubicado en instituciones académicas y comunitarias. Durante las últimas dos décadas, una buena parte de mi investigación se ha enfocado en la documentación y revitalización de las lenguas indígenas, en particular de las lenguas chatinas. Este artículo aborda mi propia experiencia como investigadora indígena que navega…
  • Los principios éticos de las metodologías en el trabajo de campo lingüístico según quién
    Abstract: Este artículo busca establecer un diálogo entre las propuestas metodológicas que se han planteado para el trabajo de campo lingüístico y las crecientes experiencias de lingüistas indígenas. Es bien sabido que la teorización de las metodologías que rigen el actuar de los lingüistas en las comunidades de estudio se lleva a cabo desde una perspectiva foránea tanto de la lengua como de la comunidad. Dichas metodologías están diseñadas y…
  • Portada
  • Portadilla
  • Volumen completo


SP21: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Language Documentation

  • Introduction:Interdisciplinary Research in Language Documentation
  • Child language documentation: A pilot project in Papua New Guinea
    Abstract: The central aim of language documentation is to comprehensively document the characteristic speech practices of a community. Such practices necessarily also include child language and child-directed speech-and yet there are only very few documentation projects that focus on language from and with children. This paper argues for studying first language acquisition and socialization within a language documentation context, focusing on the types of data needed for such a study…
  • Interdisciplinarity in areal documentation: Experiences from Lower Fungom, Cameroon
    Abstract: The Lower Fungom region of Northwest Cameroon is noteworthy for its exceptional lin- guistic diversity: Seven languages, or small language clusters, are spoken in its thirteen recognized villages. This situation prompts consideration of not only standard documen- tary concerns, such as how to collect sufficient information to grammatically describe each of the regions languages, but also raises the question: What factors have allowed Lower Fungom to develop and maintain…
  • Domain-driven documentation: The case of landscape
    Abstract: It is becoming increasingly evident that the field of language documentation and the documentary multimedia resources it produces rely on expanding their relevance and usability to disciplines beyond linguistics in order to increase their chances of being sustainable in the long term. This paper argues that more attention should be paid to the needs and interests of such disciplines in language documentation schemes. One way of doing so is…
  • Endangered Language Documentation: The challenges of interdisciplinary research in ethnobiology
    Abstract: In 2004, three national institutes jointly published Facilitating interdisciplinary research, a report that set standards for evaluating the interdisciplinarity of cross-disciplinary collaborations. Although endangered language documentation (ELD) projects often assemble multidisciplinary teams, the 2004 criteria, today followed by the NSF, create such a high bar for interdisciplinarity that it is probably better to evaluate the cross-disciplinary impact of ELD projects through a different criterion: that of service vs. science.…
  • Front Matter
  • Cover
  • Whole Volume


SP20: Collaborative Approaches to the Challenges of Language Documentation and Conservation

  • SP20 Whole Volume
  • SP20 Front Matter
  • SP20 Cover
  • A language vitality survey of Macuxi, Wapichana, and English in Serra da Lua, Roraima (Brazil)
    Abstract: Serra da Lua is a multilingual region in the state of Roraima (Brazil) where Macuxi (Carib), Wapichana (Arawak), Brazilian Portuguese and Guyanese English are all spoken. Based on a self-reported language survey we present an assessment of the vitality of the languages spoken in this region and the attitudes of the speakers to-wards these languages. While previous literature has reported the existence of English speakers in this region, the…
  • Keeping Haida alive through film and drama
    Abstract: The Haida language, of the northwest coast of Canada and Southern Alaska, has been endangered for most of the 20th century. Historically, orthography has been a difficult issue for anyone studying the language, since no standardized orthography existed. In spite of the orthographical issues, current efforts in Canada at revitalizing Haida lan-guage and culture have culminated in the theatrical production of Sinxii’gangu, a tradi-tional Haida story dramatized and performed…
  • The Online Terminology Forum for East Cree and Innu: A collaborative approach to multi-format terminology development
    Abstract: For Indigenous languages to thrive, it is essential for speakers to be able to talk about their present reality in relevant and meaningful ways. In this paper, we report on our work in terminology development through workshops and the creation and use of modern digital tools including online dictionaries and terminology forums, and by working with speakers in the creation and ongoing discussion of new words. We describe the…
  • Supporting rich and meaningful interaction in language teaching for revitalization: Lessons from Macuiltianguis Zapotec
    Abstract: Many language revitalization programs aimed at teaching Indigenous languages are small, informal efforts with limited time and resources. Even in communities that still have proficient speakers, students in revitalization programs often struggle to gain proficiency in the language. This paper offers an illustration of how one language revitalization program has tried to make teaching more effective by adapting commu-nicative language teaching strategies to be more useful and appropriate for…
  • The Kawaiwete pedagogical grammar: Linguistic theory, collaborative language documentation, and the production of pedagogical materials
    Abstract: This paper describes the intersection between linguistic theory and collaborative language documentation as a fundamental step in developing pedagogical materials for Indigenous communities. More specifically, we discuss the process of writing a monolingual pedagogical grammar of the Kawaiwete language (a Brazilian Indigenous language). This material was intended to motivate L1 speakers of Kawaiwete to think about language as researchers: by exploring linguistic datasets through the production and revision of…
  • “Data is Nice:” Theoretical and pedagogical implications of an Eastern Cherokee corpus
    Abstract: This paper serves as a proof of concept for the usefulness of corpus creation in Cherokee language revitalization. It details the initial collection of a digital corpus of Cherokee/English texts and enumerates how corpus material can augment contemporary language revitalization efforts rather than simply preserving language for future analysis. By collecting and analyzing corpus material, we can quickly create new classroom materials and media products, and answer deeper theoretical…
  • Indigenous universities and language reclamation: Lessons in balancing Linguistics, L2 teaching, and language frameworks from Blue Quills University
    Abstract: This article describes Dene and Cree language programs at University nuhelot'įne thaiyots'į nistameyimâkanak Blue Quills, a First Nations-owned university in Canada created in a former residential school building in the decades following a 1969 sit-in by concerned parents. The history of UnBQ and its role in language and cultural revitalization are situated in the context of the North American tribal college and university movement, as is the author's integration…
  • Integrating collaboration into the classroom: Connecting community service learning to language documentation training
    Abstract: As training in language documentation becomes part of the regular course offerings at many universities, there is a growing need to ensure that classroom discussions of documentary linguistic theory and best practices are balanced with the practical application of these skills and concepts. In this article, we consider Community Ser-vice Learning (CSL) in partnership with community-based organizations as one means of grounding language documentation training in realistic and collaborative…
  • Introduction
    Abstract: This chapter introduces the volume, Collaborative Approaches to the Challenge of Language Documentation and Conservation, providing a short justification for the volume, summarizing each of the eight chapters, and identifying major themes that emerge in the chapters.


SP19: Documentation and Maintenance of Contact Languages from South Asia to East Asia

  • Foreword
    Abstract: This foreword introduces the special volume "Documentation and maintenance of contact languages from South Asia to East Asia', presenting the nature and aim of the volume, as well as a summary of each of the research articles included, and highlighting its contribution to the field.
  • Kodrah Kristang: The Initiative to Revitalize the Kristang Language in Singapore
    Abstract: Kristang is the critically endangered heritage language of the Portuguese-Eurasian community in Singapore and the wider Malayan region, and is spoken by an estimated less than 100 fluent speakers in Singapore. In Singapore, especially, up to 2015, there was almost no known documentation of Kristang, and a declining awareness of its existence, even among the Portuguese-Eurasian community. However, efforts to revitalize Kristang in Singapore under the auspices of the…
  • Documenting modern Sri Lanka Portuguese
    Abstract: Sri Lanka Portuguese (SLP) is a Portuguese-lexified creole formed during Sri Lanka’s Portuguese colonial period, which lasted from the early 16th century to the mid-17th century. The language withstood several political changes and became an important medium of communication for a portion of the island’s population, but reached the late 20th century much reduced in its distribution and vitality, having essentially contracted to the Portuguese Burgher community of Eastern…
  • Peranakans in Singapore: Responses to language endangerment and documentation
    Abstract: Baba Malay is a critically endangered contact language that is home language to the Peranakans in Singapore and Malacca. This paper provides a diachronic perspective on the ways in which the Peranakan community in Singapore has responded to the issues of the issues of language endangerment and documentation. It reports qualitative observations of the community’s responses made by researchers of Baba Malay and community members in the 80s, when…
  • Documenting online writing practices: The case of nominal plural marking in Zamboanga Chabacano
    Abstract: The emergence of computer-mediated communication has brought about new opportunities for both speakers and researchers of minority or under-described languages. This paper shows how the analysis of spontaneous contemporary language samples from online social networks can make a contribution to the documentation and description of languages like Chabacano, a Spanish-derived creole spoken in the Philippines. More specifically, we focus on nominal plural marking in the Zamboangueño variety, a still…
  • SP19 Cover
  • SP19 Front Matter
  • SP19 Whole Volume

SP18: Archival Returns: Central Australia and Beyond

  • "For the children...": Aboriginal Australia, cultural access, and archival obligation
    Abstract: For whom are archival documents created and conserved? Who is obliged to care for them and provide access to their content, and for how long? The state, libraries, museums and galleries, researchers, interlocutors, genealogists, family heritage organisations? Or does material collected long ago and then archived belong personally, socially, emotionally, culturally, and intellectually to the people from whom the original material was collected and, eventually, to their descendants? In…
  • "The songline is alive in Mukurtu": Return, reuse, and respect
    Abstract: This chapter examines the return, reuse, and repositioning of archival materials within Indigenous communities and specifically within the Warumungu Aboriginal community in Central Australia. Over the last 20 years there has been an uptake in collecting institutions and scholars returning cultural, linguistic, and historical material to Indigenous communities in digital formats. These practices of digital return have been spurred by decolonisation and reconciliation movements globally, and at the same…
  • Contributors
  • Working at the interface: The Daly Languages Project
    Abstract: In this paper we present the Daly Languages Project (www.dalylanguages.org), funded by the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, and in collaboration with the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures (PARADISEC), which has developed website landing pages for all of the languages of the Daly region of northern Australia. These landing pages provide a useful and usable interface by which a range…
  • Reflections on the preparation and delivery of Carl Strehlow's heritage dictionary (1909) to the Western Aranda people
    Abstract: This chapter reflects on the predicaments encountered while bringing ethnographic and linguistic archival materials, and in particular an Aranda, German, Loritja [Luritja], and Dieri dictionary manuscript compiled by Carl Strehlow and with more than 7,600 entries, into the public domain. This manuscript, as well as other unique documents held at the Strehlow Research Centre in Alice Springs and elsewhere in Australia, is surrounded by competing views about ownership and…
  • Conundrums and consequences: Doing digital archival returns in Australia
    Abstract: The practices of archival return may provide some measure of social equity to Indigenous Australians. Yet priceless cultural collections, amassed over many decades, are in danger of languishing without ever finding reconnection to the individuals and communities of their origin. The extensive documentary heritage of Australian Indigenous peoples is dispersed, and in many cases participants in the creation of archival records, or their descendants, have little idea of where…
  • i-Tjuma: The journey of a collection – from documentation to delivery
    Abstract: In 2018, a collection of some 60 edited and subtitled films, resulting from a documentation project (2012–2018) in the Ngaanyatjarra Lands on verbal arts of the Western Desert, was ready to be returned to the Ngaanyatjarra community. In this case study, we describe the journey of this return and the cultural, ethical, and technological issues that we negotiated in the process. From the archived collection lodged with PARADISEC (Pacific…
  • Incorporating archival cultural heritage materials into contemporary Warlpiri women's yawulyu spaces
    Abstract: National archives house a rich legacy of materials that document many intangible aspects of Indigenous cultural heritage. It is the moral right of Indigenous people to have access to these materials, but their reintroduction back into present-day worlds is not without impact. Here, I analyse contemporary spaces in which Warlpiri women have engaged with archival cultural heritage materials and incorporated them into present-day contexts for the performance of yawulyu.…
  • Cover
  • Ever-widening circles: Consolidating and enhancing Wirlomin Noongar archival material in the community
    Abstract: Returning archival documentation of endangered Indigenous languages to their community of origin can provide empowering opportunities for Indigenous people to control, consolidate, enhance and share their cultural heritage with ever-widening, concentric circles of people, while also allowing time and space for communities to recover from disempowerment and dislocation. This process aligns with an affirming narrative of Indigenous persistence that, despite the context of colonial dispossession, can lead to a…
  • Front matter
  • Contents
  • Foreword
  • (Re)turning research into pedagogical practice: A case study of translational language research in Warlpiri
    Abstract: Speech corpora created primarily for linguistic research are not often easily repurposed for practical use by the communities who participated in the research. This chapter describes a process where methods and materials collected for language documentation research have been returned to speakers in communities; this involves the implementation of professional development activities for Warlpiri educators in bilingual education programs. Documentation of children’s speech took place in four Warlpiri communities…
  • Nura's vision: Nura's voice
    Abstract: For Nura Nungalka Ward (1942–2013) the art of teaching was a lifelong passion, culminating in Ninu grandmothers’ law, published by Magabala Books (2018). This autobiography is an extensive ethnography of daily life for Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara families still living on their traditional lands amid the profound changes brought by the arrival of white settlers, doggers, missionaries and atomic bomb tests. Nura’s achievement – compiling her life history illustrated with…
  • Enlivening people and country: The Lander Warlpiri cultural mapping project
    Abstract: This chapter discusses a cultural mapping project funded and directed by Lander Warlpiri Anmatyerr people in Central Australia with the collaboration of the authors and the support of the Central Land Council. The project arose from the concerns of elders over the changing lifeworld of Warlpiri people today and the reduced opportunities for younger people to acquire the embodied place-based knowledge and experiences regarded as foundational to local identity,…
  • Never giving up: Negotiating, culture-making, and the infinity of the archive
    Abstract: Archival returns are a significant issue of concern for Indigenous peoples in many settler-colonial contexts. This chapter focuses on one example from Central Australia, Aṟa Irititja, to reflect on how an archive might simultaneously preserve ‘culture’ and also reflect, accommodate, and inspire cultural change. We feature the words of an Aṉangu ‘senior law woman’, Janet Inyika (affectionately known as Mrs Never-Give-Up), and our co-authorship is consistent with this community…
  • Returning recordings of songs that persist: The Anmatyerr traditions of akiw and anmanty
    Abstract: Digitisation has made the return of recordings made by researchers in the past far more achievable than ever before. This technological advance, combined with the ethical and political imperative towards decolonising methodologies in Indigenous research, has resulted in considerable interest in ensuring that recordings of cultural value be returned to Indigenous communities. In this chapter, I reflect upon the fieldwork experience of returning archival song recordings concerning public aspects…
  • Return of a travelling song: Wanji-wanji in the Pintupi region of Central Australia
    Abstract: This chapter discusses responses to the return of legacy recordings of Pintupi singing made in 1976 and the collection of further metadata about the song Wanji-wanji featured on the recordings. Wanji-wanji was once a popular entertainment song that was performed across the western half of Australia, as can be seen by the many recordings of it held in archives. Custodianship of the song is unknown; the earliest reference to…
  • Deciphering Arrernte archives: The intermingling of textual and living knowledge
    Abstract: Arrernte people are arguably the most documented Aboriginal group in Australia. Their language was studiously documented by Lutheran scholars, their ceremonies were subject to some of the most intensive ethnographic documentation and many of their songs were meticulously recorded. In addition, genealogical and historical archives are full of Arrernte social histories, and museum stores contain thousands of Arrernte-made artefacts. This chapter contains a condensed and edited transcript of interviews…
  • "We never had any photos of my family": Archival return, film, and a personal history
    Abstract: The film Remembering Yayayi emerged from a project to return raw 16mm film footage shot in 1974 at the early Pintupi outstation of Yayayi, near Papunya, by filmmaker Ian Dunlop, with Fred Myers as translator and consultant. Two subsequent remote Pintupi communities, Kintore and Kiwirrkura, were involved in the footage’s return. The material had not been available for research (or other) purposes until 2005, when VHS copies were made…
  • Editors' preface
  • Abbreviations


SP17: Language and Toponymy in Alaska and Beyond


SP16: Methodological Tools for Linguistic Description and Typology

  • Linguistic diversity, language documentation and psycholinguistics: The role of stimuli
    Abstract: Our psycholinguistic theories tend to be based on empirical data from a biased sample of well-described languages, not doing justice to the enormous linguistic diversity in the world. As Evans and Levinson (2009: 447) put it, a major challenge of our discipline is to harness this linguistic diversity and “to show how the child’s mind can learn and the adult’s mind can use, with approximately equal ease, any one…
  • Introduction: Methodological tools for linguistic description and typology
  • Automatic construction of lexical typological Questionnaires
    Abstract: Questionnaires constitute a crucial tool in linguistic typology and language description. By nature, a Questionnaire is both an instrument and a result of typological work: its purpose is to help the study of a particular phenomenon cross-linguistically or in a particular language, but the creation of a Questionnaire is in turn based on the analysis of cross-linguistic data. We attempt to alleviate linguists’ work by constructing lexical Questionnaires automatically…
  • The TULQuest linguistic questionnaire archive
    Abstract: This article describes the development and structure of an online interactive archive for linguistic questionnaires developed by the Fédération de Typologie et Universaux Linguistiques (CNRS) program on Questionnaires. The archive allows users to both retrieve and deposit material, with questionnaires categorized according to a taxonomy of features. Questionnaires, defined by our project as any methodological tool designed to collect linguistic data, and written with a capital to highlight this…
  • Trajectoire: a methodological tool for eliciting Path of motion
    Abstract: This paper presents a methodological tool called Trajectoire that was created to elicit the expression of Path of motion in typologically and genetically varied languages. Designed within the research program TRAJECTOIRE ‘Path (of motion)’, supported by the Fédération de Typologie et Universaux Linguistiques, the Trajectoire elicitation tool aims to systematically explore the morpho-syntactic resources used for the expression of Path and the distribution of spatial information across the sentence,…
  • Using questionnaires as a tool for comparative linguistic field research: Two case studies on Javanese
    Abstract: In this paper, we discuss how written questionnaires for targeted constructions can be a beneficial tool for comparative linguistic field research through two case studies on Javanese (Austronesian; Indonesia). The first case study is based on a questionnaire designed to elicit how a language or a dialect expresses the semantic meaning of modality (Vander Klok 2014); we show how it can be implemented in three different ways for comparative…
  • Video elicitation of negative directives in Alaskan Dene languages: reflections on methodology
    Abstract: In this paper, we describe the use of video stimuli for the targeted elicitation of negative directives in Denaakk’e (Koyukon) and Nee’andeegn’ (Upper Tanana), two severely endangered Alaskan Dene languages. Negative directives are extremely rare in our previously collected data, yet they exhibit a great variety of forms. Forms further seem to depend on several factors, particularly on whether the prohibited act violates social norms known as hʉtlaanee/įįjih. To…
  • A proposal for conversational questionnaires
    Abstract: This paper proposes a new approach for collecting lexical and grammatical data: one that meets the need to control the features to be elicited, while ensuring a fair level of idiomaticity. The method, called conversational questionnaires, consists in eliciting speech not at the level of words or of isolated sentences, but in the form of a chunk of dialogue. Ahead of fieldwork, a number of scripted conversations are written…
  • Front cover
  • Front matter
  • Whole volume


SP15: Reflections on Language Documentation on the 20 year anniversary of Himmelmann 1998
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SP14: A Grammar of Shilluk

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SP13: Documenting Variation in Endangered Languages

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SP12: The Social Cognition Parallax Interview Corpus (SCOPIC)

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SP11: Mutsun-English English-Mutsun Dictionary, mutsun-inkiS inkiS-mutsun riica pappel

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SP10: African language documentation: new data, methods and approaches

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SP09: Language Documentation and Conservation in Europe

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SP08: The Art and Practice of Grammar Writing

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SP07: Language Endangerment and Preservation in South Asia

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SP06: Microphone in the mud

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SP05: Melanesian languages on the edge of Asia: Challenges for the 21st Century

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SP04: Electronic Grammaticography

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SP03: Potentials of Language Documentation: Methods, Analyses, and Utilization

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SP02: Fieldwork and Linguistic Analysis in Indigenous Languages of the Americas

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SP01: Documenting and Revitalizing Austronesian Languages

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